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Clemson football weekends generate $10.9M each

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Staff Report
gsanews@scbiznews.com
Published Aug. 31, 2015

Clemson University’s seven home football game weekends have a total economic impact of $77 million, according to an analysis that also shows net benefits of $580,000 for local governments and $784,000 for the state. The report by the Regional Dynamics and Economic Modeling Laboratory bases the total impact on spending by fans who travel from outside the immediate Clemson area.

Clemson University’s home football game weekends have a total economic impact of $77 million, according to an analysis that also shows net benefits of $580,000 for local governments and $784,000 for the state. (Photo provided by Clemson University)
Clemson University’s home football game weekends have a total economic impact of $77 million, according to an analysis that also shows net benefits of $580,000 for local governments and $784,000 for the state. (Photo provided by Clemson University)

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The totals, updated from a 2011 report by lab director Robert T. Carey to reflect 2014 dollars, are based on average game attendance of more than 78,000. The estimates include weekend spending on meals, souvenirs and hotel rooms. The update estimates the dollar value of goods and services produced as a result of fan spending each weekend at $10.9 million, with 198 jobs created by the spending and “ripple effects.”

The Strom Thurmond Institute lab report shows each Clemson home game nets $211,824 in local government revenue for Greenville County; Anderson County, $109,122; Pickens County, $99,493; Oconee County, $42,793; and $579,842 statewide. State government net revenue from each game totals $784,177.

“Every time someone spends their income on a purchase, that spending creates income for the seller,” the report says. “However the impact of that consumer’s spending does not stop there. The retailer, for example, will use that income to pay its employees, rent on the building, taxes and to purchase more merchandise. All of this spending by the retailer, in turn, creates income for its employees and its suppliers. The employees and suppliers likewise spend their income. Therefore, the impact from the consumer’s initial purchase spreads through the economy like ripples in a pond.”

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